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Best SQL Server Bloggers

I found an interesting site that ranks the best SQL Server bloggers. Maintained by Thomas LaRock, the SQL Rockstar site provides his personal rankings of SQL Server-related bloggers in a number of categories.

For example, the RESOURCEDB group, which LaRock describes as “the bloggers you should immediately start following and never stop,” includes the following:

  • Glenn Berry (blog | @GlennAlanBerry)
  • Jonathan Kehayias (blog | @SQLPoolboy)
  • Brent Ozar (blog | @BrentO)
  • Paul Randal (blog | @PaulRandal)
  • Kimberly Tripp (blog | @KimberlyLTripp)
  • Buck Woody (blog | @buckwoody)

I counted nearly 60 bloggers listed across all the groups. Wow. If Thomas has time to keep up with that many bloggers and still have a day job, well, more power to him. I certainly couldn't do that.

I also noticed that the site concerns SQL Server generally, with a lot of DBA stuff, career advice and so on. So, in view of those two points, I'd like a more concise ranking of bloggers more specific to the interest of Data Driver readers: database development (SQL Server mainly, but other technologies are fair game, also).

So who better to compile such a list than you readers? Such a list would benefit us all, and here's your chance to weigh in. Comment here or shoot me an e-mail with your votes for the best database development bloggers.

Posted by David Ramel on 07/17/2012 at 1:15 PM


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