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Extending the ASP.NET Core Processing Pipeline

I've done at least a couple of articles on how to support adding custom processing to every request to your ASP.NET MVC site (most recently, an article on HTTP Modules and Handlers). In ASP.NET Core the process is very different (of course) but it's actually much simpler.

Your first step to adding some processing to the ASP.NET pipeline is to create a class whose constructor accepts a RequestDelegate object. You should store that RequestDelegate in a property or field because you'll need it later:

public class CheckPhoto
{
  private readonly RequestDelegate rd;
  public CheckPhoto(RequestDelegate next)
  {
    rd = next;
  }

Your second step is to add an async method to your class called Invoke and have it accept an HttpContext object and return a Task:

  public async Task Invoke(HttpContext ctxt)
  {

In that method you should call the Invoke method on the RequestDelegate passed to your constructor, passing on that HttpContext object (use the await keyword to get the benefits of asynchronous processing). By calling the Invoke method, you're invoking the next module in the processing chain during request processing -- that HttpContext object includes information about the incoming request. When that Invoke method returns, it means all the processing associated with that request is complete (including running your own code, of course) and the HttpContext object holds everything associated with your application's response.

Anything you want to do in terms of processing the incoming request should be done before calling the Invoke method; anything you want to do with the Response, you should do with the HttpContext after calling the Invoke method.

This means a typical Invoke method looks like this:

  public async Task Invoke(HttpContext ctxt)
  {
    // ... work with HttpContext in handling the incoming request ... 
    await rd.Invoke(ctxt);
    // ... work with HttpContext in handling the outgoing response ... 
  }
}

To tell your site to use your module, first go to the Configure method in your project's Startup class. In the Configure method, call the UseMiddleware method on the IApplicationBuilder object passed to the method, referencing your class. Since the parameter holding the IApplicationBuilder object is called app, that code looks like this:

app.UseMiddleware<CheckPhoto>();

Posted by Peter Vogel on 01/11/2019 at 5:05 PM


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